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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
on family and race in america, and her return to acting. get ready for an oprah like never before. >>> good evening to you on this friday night. as we all head into this weekend together, another reminder of this uncertain world. there is a worldwide alert that al qaeda is looking for a moment to strike. today the state department issuing an alert warning americans overseas, that a plot is under way. but are there specific targets, and what should americans do? abc's chief global affairs correspondent, martha raddatz, tracking all the latest developments for us tonight. martha? >> today's global travel alert comes as the state department is preparing to shut down more than 20 embassies and consulates, the most to be closed since 9/11. a terrible reminder for americans that we are still major targets. the worldwide warning is alarming and unusually broad. it covers travel for americans across the globe and cautions travelers to be especially wary of tourist sites and public transportation. also unusual, the warning will stay in effect until the end of august. terrorists may use a variety of
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
of violence in america calls each of us to collectively resist all forms of violence in our society. in particular, black on black violence that disproportionately affects every facet of black life in america. we must learn to live together in peace or we will most surely die apart in our own neglect. on the other hand, reaction on twitter. allen west tweeted, who will the president of the united states identify with this time? so we're starting to see more reaction on both sides of the aisle. ainsley, steve, brian, back to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa c
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the courtroom today for a familiar face. there was at least one, michelle knight, one of the three women he imprisoned in his home fair decade of sexual and emotional brutality. she told the court and castro what it was like living in that house with its windows boarded up, trip alarms on the doors, the heavy chains, the pole th
alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party. look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand
. >>> joining me now is john watch -- walsh. host of america's most wanted. fascinating interview, painting a very different picture, sort of kind of persona that we seem to be dealing with with a mass killer and kidnapper. what do you make of it? >> well, he's certainly hoping it isn't his friend and we live in such a society that both you and i would say this man is accused of kidnapping this girl and murdering her mother and probably her brother. we should stay accused by the fbi and police say he is pedophile that kidnapped a 16-year-old girl and the main suspect in the murder e of her mother and the murder of her 8-year-old brother, although they haven't determined those are his remains yet. so it seems the law enforcement agencies and the state of california, which issued the amber alert think he's the number one suspect. let's not forget about jerry sandusky who was sod miezing an 11-year-old boy in the locker room and nobody could believe it was jerry sandusky. >> right. >> ariel castro who kept three girls in a house for ten years, his little 14-year-old daughter was gina dee jesu
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
wrote about in the "the washington post" this week. america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we have created an economy of fear, an industry of fear, a national psychology of fear. al qaeda could have never achieved that on its own. we have inflicted it on ourselves. >> fundamentally, there are two sets of questions that apply in the war against terrorism. the one set of questions deals with the where's it going to happen, what's going to happen, and when is it going to happen. the other set of questions deals with what is it that our enemy, the terrorists, are trying to achieve? what are they trying to induce us to do? take a look at what's been happening over the past week. with a conference call, al qaeda has effectively shut down 20 u.s. embassies around north africa and the middle east. we just had the president of yemen here for a meeting with president obama. he goes back feeling wonderful about his new relationship with the president. next thing the president does is says in effect, sorry, but we don't trust you yemenis to protect your embassies so in effect we shut down our
metric testing has indicated that in at least in america, you have jews with the highest average i.q., followed by east asians. these are real differences, they're not going to go away tomorrow. >> that is the guy who jim demint hired as senior policy analyst to crunch the numbers on immigration reform. lo and behold, the heritage study finds when a guy like that crunches the numbers. it turns out that immigrants are terrible. they're so dumb and they can never get smarter. not without better breeding at least. that was really embarrassing for the heritage foundation. it's also embarrassing they never fired that guy once everybody reported what his background was when the report came out and freaked everybody out. after his background came out, they never explained why they hired him in the first place. the heritage foundation is still sights the report as if it's good science. here's the thing about the heritage foundation. jim demint is the president of the group now, the head of research at the heritage foundation is this guy. do you remember him? do you remember david adding to
exactly who he is talking about. in the meantime one of the most outspoken businessmen into america might try to pay his way into the white house, so he says. donald trump is willing to shell out big bucks for presidential bid in 2016. he had a short run campaign in the republican primaries but dropped out to back former governor mitt romney. "the donald" explaining just how far he is willing to dig into his wallet. >> if you were to run for president, how much would you be will to spend on your campaign? >> if i made a decision i would spend a lot. >> a modern presidential campaign can be half a billion dollars. >> can be or more. no, i would be willing to spend, if i did it i would spend whatever it took. jenna: if, if he did it. claiming a fortune more than $10 billion, trump said voters would see a man who built a company with tremendous net worth. he hasn't been totally forthcoming about how much money is actually in his companies which has been controversial over the last self years but that's what he says his company is worth. we'll take him at his word. >> he has been accused in t
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
for civil rights in america. the man who snapped them tells us his story. next. you know throughout history, folks have suffered from frequent heartburn. but getting heartburn and then treating day after day is a thing of the past. block the acid with prilosec otc, and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. [ villain ] well mr. baldwin... it appears our journey has come to a delightful end. then i better use the capital one purchase eraser to redeem my venture miles for this trip. purchase eraser? it's the easy way to erase any recent travel expense. i just pick a charge, like my flight with a few taps, it's taken care of. impressive baldwin. does it work for hotels? absolutely thank goodness. mrs. villain and i are planning our... you scare me. and i like it. let's go what's in your wallet? could change your tomorrow, if you do something today. with our career catalyst scholarship you can. apply by august 29th for up to $20,000 for qualifying new students. visit devry.edu. for qualifying new students. i'to guard their man
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
of america. i have profound concerns about the reins act. what will it be on air and water quality. this bill would undermine the ability of agencies to protect the public interest. it is continuation of the majority anti--middle class, big business regulatory approach to governing. they rely on debunk bipartisan studies. they presuppose that regulations have harmful effects on job growth. far from it. there is bipartisan evidence in support of the opposite conclusion. regulations ensure that the air and water we consume. the air that we breathe. the places where we work and where our kids go to school are safe. regulations ensure fairness in the workplace and in the marketplace. regulations are necessary to s, tect tv nots from the have whereas the reins act protects the have nots from the haves. this is an out of control freight train to drive its reckless regulatory agenda through congress. this threatens us to send us back in time to the early 1900's, where there was no workplace protections and no limits on wall street. if republican leadership truly believed in creating jobs, we would h
of the many issues america disagrees with russia about. i'm thinking about other serious issues like syria, iran, et cetera. >>peter: when you think back on history, is this the way we used to treat russia, even in the cold war? you go back 53 years ago to the famous kitchen debate between khruschev and vice president richard nixon and that was broadcast both in the united states and in the soviet union then, and that was a robust debate about their disagreements in terms of foreign policy, and it got very, very personal. so some people are asking this morning, why isn't the president putting it to putin in september in russia when he has a chance to go face-to-face, head to head. >>steve: the whole u.s.-russia reset has been a disaster every since hillary clinton famously handed her russian counterpart that reset button and she thought it said reset translated into russian. as it turned out it said overcharged. oops-a-daisy. it certainly marks a low point for this president in our relations r russia. once upon a time we were a superpower. we would kick russia's butt. but now in this situa
will have to do it without america's closest ally. last night britain's closest parliament said no to military action. >> this morning, u.n. inspectors inside syria are finishing their investigation into last week's attack that killed hundreds. elizabeth palmer has made her way into syria. we also have mark phillips in london and major garrett in washington. but we begin with elizabeth in damascus who went out this morning with those u.n. inspectors. elizabeth. >> they left the hotel and made a couple ss actually. it looked as if they wanted to go back ton the suburbs they visited earlier in the week the site of wednesday's attack but turned back. maybe because there was heavy shelling. i can hear the artillery now as i sit in the studio. it's been going on all morning. so instead, we followed them to the military hospital where they were going to talk to six soldiers also allegedly suffering from the effects of chemical poisoning or some sort of toxin. maybe soldiers who were on the road blocks around those suburbs that were hit last wednesday or perhaps
of the united states of america. >> the conservative family leadership summit ended yesterday in iowa after party leaders all took the stage. donald trump, who was once again considering his own presidential bid, was also there in iowa. this is what he said about the 2012 election. >> i like mitt romney personally. i think he's a very good guy. i don't know what the hell happened with his campaign. i just don't get it. that was an election that couldn't have been lost. it couldn't have been lost. >> donald trump in iowa. let's get right to the brain trust. goldie taylor, and the managing editor of the goldie taylor project. and also an msnbc contributor and political editor for the grio. and the daily caller writes for u.s. news and world report. good to have all of you with us on a sunday afternoon. goldie, the fallout from the nsa leaks by edward snowden, cancellation of talks with russia's president vladimir putin. it has put u.s. relations with russia under a microscope. senator john mccain said this morning that be russia has no interest in maintaining a good relationship with the unit
that the election for that senate seat is going to be held in october? on a wednesday. here in america, we generally hold big statewide, big federal elections on tuesdays in november. wednesday in october? and, in fact, new jersey already has a previously scheduled big statewide election on a tuesday this november. a big normal election on a big normal election day. tuesday in november. but the u.s. senate seat election between cory booker and the former mayor is going to be held on a different day, less than three weeks before the normal election day on a wednesday. why? because on that tuesday in november, real election day, new jersey governors chris christie, is on the ballot. he's running for re-election as new jersey governor, and as he is making the state of new jersey spend an extra $12 million to hold a whole separate election for this senate seat, less than three weeks before there's going to be an election anyway. amazing. presumably he is going this because he does not want to be on the same ballot with a democrat as popular as cory booker. there is basically no one in politics who think
last day on current tv. al jazeera america starts i guess on tuesday, but i'm not sure. >> al jazeera has a big house. >> stephanie: indeed. we will have a new television show -- we're on vacation the first week in september, but as soon as we know we'll tweet you out. and you can get the steph cast. [ bell chimes ] >> absolutely. go to stephaniemiller.com to find out how. >> stephanie: yes. in the meantime, guess who is here, our thursday buddy, our pal. ♪ karl >> stephanie: karl frisch, bullfightstrategies.com. ♪ frisch >> stephanie: good morning. >> good morning. i think i get to break the news, hence forth after your vacation, the show will be aired from jim's colonoscopy. >> stephanie: yes, and the rumor is that we're going to dog tv, but that rumor is incorrect. >> no, it is animal planet 6. >> stephanie: right. >> and they will just be sitting? our stead, feed them peanut butter, watch their mouths move. >> stephanie: karl frisch, we have to take a peak into right wing world, you know the rodeo clown incident -- >> yes. >> stephanie: it turned into a giant klan rally -- >>
stories, no nothing. you are cut off. america will pay its debts. it will not default. it will not destroy its credit in the world. and you can threaten. you can scream and yell, but the united states government will not fail in the bankruptcy because of this economic terrorism you on the right purport to be a political philosophy. well, the secretary of the treasury said it less dramatically this morning, but said it just as clearly. any attempt by the right wing to threaten this country with national default will be met with the strongest response, no deals. bashar al assad in damascus, but against those in this country who would jeopardize the country's financial strength. joining me right now are two political pros, democrat steve mcmahon, and republican john fayry. treasury secretary jack lew is warning republicans that unless they agree to raise the debt limit, the united states will default on its debts internationally in mid-october, earlier than some had anticipated. in fact, on an interview today on cnbc, mr. lew had a clear message for republicans, and it's coming right from the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 117 (some duplicates have been removed)